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Archive for June, 2012

I just cleaned out a pile of papers and came across some notes from a seminar given by Boyd Huppert (KARE) at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, I believe in 2009, for students and local professionals.
I attended while I was working as Internet Director at KTIV in Sioux City. I always enjoy these types of seminars and feel like any take-aways should be shared with the world. Needless to say I am long overdue in typing this up! These are just my notes, Mr. Huppert used a couple of example stories, but I’m sure you’ll know what they mean!

On shooting —
“shoot and move”
Don’t cross the 180 degree line – stay on the same side
Establish wide shot
Interview – try to continue the action/story in the background
Sequencing – continuity – move the story along with variety of shots
Shot just: 1)made 2)now 3)next
Cut-aways will save you! (wide, medium, tight, tight, tight)
Shoot as you go – make one line with lots of little stops
Don’t forget the people
Best placement for microphone=out of the shot
Remember every story has a beginning, middle and end*
In & out – of the frame. Let the subject leave the frame
Think about the possibility of your raw tape going to air

Stand-ups —
Contribute to the story
Maintain flow
Action in the background
Brief
Don’t influence the story/stage the action. If you miss an important shot, cut away. Maybe it becomes the stand-up…
Don’t do stand-ups by a wall

Getting started —
Focus – beginning, middle, end (the roadmap as storytellers and for the viewer)
Where’s this going to start?
Do you have a main character?
Interview
Character – get to know him
Moments -natural – the things you remember
Details are like Velcro, they stick to you
You must know your focus!

Things to start a story —
1. Establish the focus (commitment)
2. Handshake shot: show the character
3. At least one meaningful detail about the character

Nat sound:
Puts you there
Provides information
Sets the pace (throttle)

Mic-ing your subject
“could you help me with something?”
“do you mind wearing this, we’ll back away”

Good print writers are descriptive
– broadcasters aren’t descriptive

Posting to the web: can’t cut and paste your copy

A good story needs layers – identify your layers when you start to write

The work is in the transitions – once identified move on.

Print = inverted pyramid
TV = layers keep the viewer from looking away

Writing OVER versus TO the video
Any sound is better than gunshots
Describe the bigger picture
“say it, prove it”

Active interviewing – natural setting, they’re being themselves

Write the open and the close/tag
details stick with you
Don’t beat yourself up if your struggling to write a story, it takes time. Boyd Huppert says he’s a slow writer.

*This is my favorite tip. It’s the most basic and a foundation for so much more.

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